Archive for the ‘Data Breach’ Category

In 2013, we’ll have to make a choice: Either we acknowledge we’re at war and push back hard, or we keep pretending nothing’s wrong⎯and get snuffed.

In the coming weeks, as we’ve seen every year for the past six, there will be endless reports detailing the digital dangers and identity threats lurking in every corner of our highly networked universe. But allow me to ask a heretical question: To what end?

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When you hear a number like “94 million” in the news, it’s usually because somebody won the lottery. This time around, no such luck. This 94 million is the number of Americans’ files in which personal information has been exposed, since 2009, to potential at government agencies. Go ahead, count the zeroes: 94,000,000. That’s like releasing the personal data of every man, woman and child in California, Texas, New York, and Ohio.

Believe it or not, this number — which was just revealed — is only the most conservative estimate. When you take into account the difference between reported data breaches, which is what this report measures, and actual incidents, you are talking about a much, much bigger number. As bad as the numbers are, it gets worse. Much worse. Indeed, the biggest threat doesn’t come from smart hackers — it comes from dumb politicians and bureaucrats.

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By Matt Cullina

With Canadian privacy breaches in the news and , businesses in Canada are recognizing that their data is increasingly at risk. As our lives move into the digital sphere, the security and privacy of sensitive personal information is increasingly vulnerable. For example, when an electronic health record is exposed, the privacy of a patient has been breached. In the event an individual’s social insurance number is compromised, his or her financial accounts and credit worthiness could be susceptible to fraud. These risks are still relatively new to many businesses in Canada, but they’re growing every day.

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The Olympics are supposed to celebrate the best in human nature, bridging divides of culture and nation through sportsmanship and fair competition. Inevitably, however, the Olympic Games also can become a stage for failure, for people so blinded by ego and the will to win that they compromise all the noble principles for which they supposedly stand. From Tonya Harding’s role in the attack on her figure skating rival Nancy Kerrigan in the lead-up to the 1994 Olympics to Tyler Hamilton’s recent admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs, which led the International Olympic Committee to strip him of his 2004 gold medal, some athletes knowingly supplant truth and hard work with “the ends justify the means” philosophy and subvert the foundation of the games.

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Scott Walker has earned a national reputation for his hack-and-slash approach to government spending. Working hand-in-glove with both Houses of the GOP-controlled Legislature, the Wisconsin governor .

While tight with the purse strings when it comes to public employees and a self-proclaimed advocate for small business (though very well-funded by big business), apparently the Walker administration does support full employment for at least one group of workers that clearly doesn’t rely upon collective bargaining: identity thieves.
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By Brian McGinley

In the spirit of the Olympic Games under way this summer in London, we’ve opted to award gold, silver and bronze medals to companies and government institutions for their performance in the 2012 (In)Security Games.

Find out which organizations experienced the thrill of a well-designed privacy plan and which ones endured the agony of an easily prevented data breach. The goal is simple. We want organizations to get smarter about data security to better protect consumers’ personally identifiable information.

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The latest bill to address the problem of data breaches is just one of an increasingly long line of proposed federal breach notice regulations with little to no chance of becoming law this year.

The was introduced last month by Sen. Patrick Toomey, a Pennsylvania Republican. It’s the eighth one of its kind to be introduced in Congress.

But with the upcoming election and a partisan fervor that unbelievably has trickled down into data security legislation, it’s unlikely to get voted on this year.

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As a security consultant who travels up to 40 weeks a year, T. Robert Wyatt has spent his share of nights in Hilton hotels. In recent years, he has noticed problems with Hilton that extend far beyond unclean rooms or clogged shower drains.

According to a lengthy recent blog post, Wyatt says that he has found a series of significant security problems on various Hilton websites. The problems may expose regular Hilton guests to the risks of data breaches and identity theft, similar to those that hit LinkedIn, LastFM, Sony and other prominent companies over the last year.

Wyatt also alleges that the company knows about the security problems, but has repeatedly ignored warnings about them.

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