Archive for the ‘Hacking/Viruses’ Category

By Ondrej Krehel,

What has been done will be done again, the old saying goes. There is nothing new under the sun.

That applies to a RankMyHack.com, a new website that has turned hacking into a game of sorts. Hackers submit details of their latest attacks so that members can award points for their complexity or difficulty. The main page is a simple leaderboard of registered members and their point totals. More than 700 members have joined the site since it opened in July, according to The New York Times.

(more…)

By Ondrej Krehel,

News of Osama bin Laden’s death wasn’t a day old before hackers moved in.

They flooded social networking sites like Facebook with spam—links that promised images of the al-Qaeda leader but that led to corrupted Flash plug-ins that disrupted Google search results.

This week’s 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks  will be no different. The Department of Homeland Security to be on the lookout for email scams related to Hurricane Irene and 9/11. Already, there have been reports of a commemorative 9/11 coin scam.

(more…)

By Ondrej Krehel,

Turns out Yale has more than a few Skull and Bones in the closet.

The Ivy League school fell prey to Google hacking, also known as Google dorking, when cybercriminals use Google search functions to access data on the Internet. USA Today’s Bryon Acohido has a on the topic.

(more…)

By Eduard Goodman, Identity Theft 911

An interesting Appellate Court opinion was recently issued that, while limited in scope, requires us to acknowledge the expanding realm of our own identity footprints and the need for evolving views of how we define identity theft. The case, PEOPLE v. ROLANDO S., stemmed from a Juvenile Court case in Kings county California. The case involving teenagers was based on the following facts:

Rolando S., a minor, was one of several recipients of an unsolicited text message containing the password to the victim’s email account. Rolando, who apparently had been in trouble with the law before, used this information to gain access to the victim’s email account. Once he was in, he accessed her Facebook account and profile. Then Rolando proceeded to post vulgar, sexually oriented comments on the walls of a couple of the victim’s male Facebook friends pretending to be her. He even modified the victim’s profile adding additional sexually oriented comments.

(more…)

By Brian McGinley

Data breaches are an everyday occurrence affecting millions of Americans each year.

Just ask crafters who shop at , Sony PlayStation Network gamers and investors at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney.

They’re all vulnerable to identity theft and other fraud because their personally identifiable information (PII), such as a birth date or Social Security number, for example, was exposed. That information could be used to commit financial fraud.

What should you do if this happens to you? The first step is to call your insurance company or bank to see if you qualify for . We’ll help you assess your risk and, if warranted, take steps to make you less vulnerable.

(more…)

By Ondrej Krehel,

A forensic research firm recently . The team decrypted the encryption algorithm used on Apple’s iPhone iOS 4 operating system.

This means that sensitive user data—information about how, when and where the phone was used—can be lifted off the device or an iTunes copy of the phone’s backup. Previously such information was used by Apple and Apple alone.

The researchers at have said they’ll make “Phone Password Breaker” available to “established law enforcement, forensic and intelligence agencies as well as select government organizations” to make sure they don’t “fall into the wrong hands.” But we all know that if it can be done, it’s only a matter of time before the black hats figure out how to do it.

(more…)

By Ondrej Krehel,

There are more than 200 million iPhones and iPads out there in consumer land. Most of them are connected to a Mac or PC via iTunes, Apple’s popular music player and file sync program.

Every time the phone or tablet is connected, by USB, to the host computer, iTunes can automatically sync your selected music, documents, photos and contacts. There’s no prompt when you download Lady Gaga’a new album and add it to a playlist that’s on your phone. The music simply shows up on your device after a short background sync.

But what about when you use multiple computers for multiple devices? What about those pesky wires? This is what Apple’s trying to work around with its recently announced iCloud service.

(more…)

By

More than 360,000 Citibank customers had their private information hacked last month, nearly double the , according to a press release issued by the bank on Wednesday.

The hackers accessed customers’ names, account numbers and email addresses. They did not get to see other information especially useful for committing fraud, including Social Security numbers, dates of birth, card security codes and expiration dates, according to the bank.

The attack affected Citi’s Account Online system, but not the company’s main transaction processing network. The company assured consumers that they won’t have to pay for any fraudulent purchases resulting from the data breach.
(more…)

By Ondrej Krehel,

As our smartphones have become our wallets and personal computers, holding everything from banking to social network information, they’ve become targets for hackers, scammers and criminals. Our phones hold a treasure trove of data—and the bad guys know it.

A screen lock is no longer enough.

Dream Droid, a botnet-type of malware program, recently . It got its name because the malware activated at night, affecting users while they were asleep. Originally it was thought that 21 apps were infected, but an independent security firm found an additional 30 apps. Google flipped its famous kill switch—a scary, but seemingly necessary, piece of code that accesses phones without users’ permission and deletes the offending software. About 260,000 Android users were hit. The phone’s IMEI identifier numbers were stolen, but no other personal user information was breached.

(more…)

By

Hundreds of thousands of Citibank customers had their account information accessed by hackers recently, according to an announcement Wednesday by the bank. Hackers gained access to the accounts through Citi Account Online, the bank’s online banking website.

About 1% of the bank’s card customers were affected by the breach, .

Customers’ names, account numbers and contact information, including email addresses, were illegally accessed. Hackers failed to get other information including birth dates, Social Security numbers, card security codes and expiration dates.

“We are contacting customers whose information was impacted,” a spokesman told Reuters. “Citi has implemented enhanced procedures to prevent a recurrence of this type of event.”

[Related Article: ]

is Credit.com’s Staff Writer. Chris graduated with honors from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and has reported for a number of publications including The New York Times, TIME magazine and Popular Mechanics.

This article originally appeared on .